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Regional Medical Center of San Jose
Good Samaritan Hospital

Intensive Care Unit

Kashif Z Hassan, MD

Kashif Z Hassan, MD
Medical Director

Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

Having a loved one in the ICU can be a very stressful time for you and your family. Regional Medical Center’s ICU provides a high level of specialized care. Nurses working in the ICU have received specialty education to care for your loved one.

Advanced Personalized Care

Regional Medical Center's ICU is a 34-bed unit that typically cares for patients with acute medical conditions such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, cardiac disease, renal or pulmonary complications, electrolyte imbalancessepsis and trauma. This specialized unit, divided into areas with staff trained to care for certain patient populations, is equipped with advanced monitoring technology which is linked to the Emergency Department for ease of patient transfers. Our critical care nursing team is specially trained and assigned to the specific, dedicated areas.

What is an Intensivist?

An Intensivist is a physician who specializes in the care and treatment of patients in intensive care. Regional's ICU is staffed 24/7 by board certified Intensivists and Neuro Intensivists. These physicians receive an extra level of training and board certification to care for the sickest of patients. You can be assured your loved one is receiving the highest level of care possible with the staff of highly trained and experienced intensivists.


Regional's  is unique among community-based hospitals. It is staffed 24 x 7 by Neuro Intensivists (physicians with neuro privileges, additional level of training and/or board certification in critical care medicine). This unit is dedicated to treating stroke patients and patients with other neurological diseases. .

Multidisciplinary Rounds

A team of doctors, nurses, and other care providers make rounds daily in the ICU between 10:30 and 12:00. The goal is to coordinate care across many healthcare disciplines.

What else can we expect in the ICU?

In addition to the specialized staff of nurses, doctors and nurse practitioners, you can expect to receive emotional and social support, including Palliative Care. Palliative Care is a multidisciplinary approach to medical care for people with serious illnesses. It focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptomspain, physical stress, and mental stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis. The goal of such therapy is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family. Palliative care is provided by a team of physicians, nurses and other health professionals (social workers, case managers, spiritual support) who work together with the primary care physician and referred specialists to provide an extra layer of support. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided along with curative treatment.

Spiritual Services

Spiritual services are available by request. Please ask a staff member for more information. Your own spiritual leader is welcome to visit the patient.

Regional Medical Center provides a comfortable waiting area for families and will communicate regularly about the medical status of your loved one and work with you to design a plan of care upon discharge from the ICU.

Limited Visiting Hours:

6:30 am to 7:30 am
2:30 pm to 3:30 pm
10:30 pm to 11:30 pm

To avoid patient fatigue, please limit visitors to immediate family only and to 2 people at a time.
Exceptions can be made based upon patient condition or patient/family situations

Medication Quiet Hours

8:30 am to 9:30 am
9:30 pm to 10:30 pm

We promote safety for your loved one. During the Medication Quiet Hours, please do not interrupt the nursing staff or engage in conversation with them unless it is urgent

Infection Control

Due to infection control concerns:

  • Visitors under the age of 12 are not permitted in the ICU, except under extenuating circumstances.
  • Flowers and plants are not permitted in the ICU